Prof. Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop

Chief Investigator, Professor

Professor Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop has long standing experience with lasers, linear and nonlinear high-resolution spectroscopy, laser micromanipulation, and atom cooling and trapping. She was one of the originators of the widely used laser enhanced ionisation spectroscopy technique and is well known for her recent work in laser micromanipulation.

She has been also working (Nanotechnology Laboratory, Göteborg, Sweden) in the field of nano- and microfabrication in order to produce the microstructures needed for optically driven micromachines and tips for the scanning force microscopy with optically trapped stylus. Recently she led the team that observed dynamical tunnelling in quantum chaotic system. Additionally Prof. Rubinsztein-Dunlop has led the new effort into development of new nano-structured quantum dots for quantum computing and other advanced device related applications.

Prof. Rubinsztein-Dunlop is a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems

2016

The development of novel trapping potentials for degenerate quantum gases has been an important factor driving experimental progress in the field. The introduction of spatial light modulators (SLMs) into quantum gas laboratories means that a range of configurable geometries are now possible.

Interferometric measurements with matter waves are established techniques for sensitive gravimetry, rotation sensing, and measurement of surface interactions, but compact interferometers will require techniques based on trapped geometries.

2014

McKay Parry Nicholas et al, 2014
Review of Scientific Instruments, 85, 8, pp. 86103

We describe a magnetic coil design utilizing concentrically wound electro-magnetic insulating (EMI) foil (25.4 μm Kapton backing and 127 μm thick layers). The magnetic coils are easily configurable for differentcoil sizes, while providing large surfaces for low-pressure (0.12 bar) water cooling.

2013

Lenz Martin et al, 2013
Physical Review A, 88, 1

The study of dynamical tunneling in a periodically driven anharmonic potential probes the quantum-classical transition via the experimental control of the effective Planck's constant for the system.

2011

Garrett Michael C. et al, 2011
Physical Review A, 83, 1

We study the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a cigar-shaped three-dimensional harmonic trap, induced by the controlled addition of an attractive “dimple” potential along the weak axis.

2009

Meppelink R. et al, 2009
Physical Review A, 80, 4

We observe the formation of shock waves in a Bose-Einstein condensate containing a large number of sodium atoms. The shock wave is initiated with a repulsive blue-detuned light barrier, intersecting the Bose-Einstein condensate, after which two shock fronts appear.

2008

Schnelle S. K. et al, 2008
Optics Express, 16, 3, pp. 1405

We propose and investigate a technique for generating smooth two-dimensional potentials for ultra-cold atoms based on the rapid scanning of a far-detuned laser beam using a two-dimensional acousto-optical modulator (AOM).

ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS) (2011–2018)

Abstract: The future of technology lies in controlling the quantum world. The ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS) will deliver the building blocks of future quantum technologies and, critically, ensure Australian primacy in this endeavour. Three strategic research programs will target Quantum Measurement and Control; Synthetic Quantum Systems and Simulation; and Quantum-Enabled Sensors and Metrology.

ARC Discovery Projects: Riding a quantum wave: transport and flow of atomic quantum fluids (2015–2018)

Abstract: In our lab, we use lasers and magnetic fields to cool tiny samples of millions of atoms to temperatures a few billionths of a degree above absolute zero. At such cold temperatures they form a superfluid known as a Bose-Einstein condensate, that flows with zero viscosity. Using tailored light fields to trap and guide the atoms, we will build rudimentary atomic circuits, and coax the superfluid to flow through a channel between two reservoirs, firstly with thermodynamic gradients, and secondly by building a quantum pump.