Grants and collaborations

Our group is supported by number of grants and collaboration schemes from the Australian Research Council (ARC), Defence Science and Technology Group (DST-Group), and the University of Queensland:

ARC Future Fellowship - Turbulent Cascades in Superfluid Flatland (2020-2024)

This ARC funded Future Fellowship project will determine how vortex dynamics redistribute energy across broad length scales in superfluids, how turbulence arises from instabilities, and how turbulence redistributes energy in multicomponent superfluids. The results will be beneficial to the understanding of the physics of quantum superfluids, and will inform the engineering of quantum-enhanced devices that utilise trapped superfluid media for precision sensing.

ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQUS) (2011–2022)

Abstract: The future of technology lies in controlling the quantum world. The ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS) will deliver the building blocks of future quantum technologies and, critically, ensure Australian primacy in this endeavour. Three strategic research programs will target Quantum Measurement and Control; Synthetic Quantum Systems and Simulation; and Quantum-Enabled Sensors and Metrology.

ARC Discovery Projects: Riding a quantum wave: transport and flow of atomic quantum fluids (2015–2018)

Abstract: In our lab, we use lasers and magnetic fields to cool tiny samples of millions of atoms to temperatures a few billionths of a degree above absolute zero. At such cold temperatures they form a superfluid known as a Bose-Einstein condensate, that flows with zero viscosity. Using tailored light fields to trap and guide the atoms, we will build rudimentary atomic circuits, and coax the superfluid to flow through a channel between two reservoirs, firstly with thermodynamic gradients, and secondly by building a quantum pump.

ARC Discovery Projects: Spin vortex dynamics in a ferromagnetic superfluid (2020-2023)

Magnetic spin vortices are stable whirlpool-like objects that can spontaneously form when magnetic materials are rapidly cooled. This project aims to understand and manipulate spin vortices in a magnetic quantum fluid, one of the cleanest and most controllable magnetic systems. The significance is that spin vortices are potentially fundamental elements of future electronic technologies for advanced storage and logic. The expected outcomes are the ability to create spin vortices on demand, and the characterisation of their suitability for future applications.

Making, Probing, and Understanding Two-Dimensional Quantum Turbulence

Marsden Fund (Wellington) grant#UOO1726 (2018-2021), CI Dr Ashton Bradley, PIs Dr Tyler W Neely and Prof. Brian P Anderson (University of Arizona). 

Optimised trapping technology for atomtronic circuits and biological systems (2017)

With our succesful implementation of DMD-based optical trapping, we received a seed funding grant to collaborate with Dr. Jinyang Liang of INRS (Quebec). This goal of this grant was to develop techniques for the optimisation of greyscale DMD potentials.