Dr. Tyler Neely

Research fellow, ARC Discovery Grant Chief Investigator

Dr. Neely was born and educated in the United States, completing his B.S. in Physics and Mathematics at the University of Oregon. He then attended the University of Arizona's College of Optical Sciences. In Arizona, he worked on experiments investigating superfluid vortices and critical phenomena in Bose-Einstein Condensates (BEC), in the group of A/Prof Brian Anderson. On completing his Ph.D. he completed a postdoctoral study at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Boulder, Colorado, where he investigated the application of frequency combs to mid-infrared spectroscopy in the group of Dr. Scott Diddams.

At the University of Queensland, he is a member of the Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS) where as been implementing the dual-species microscope apparatus.

2018

Rapidly scanning magnetic and optical dipole traps have been widely utilized to form time-averaged potentials for ultracold quantum gas experiments.

Olsen M. K., Neely T. W. and Bradley A. S., 2018
Physical Review Letters, 120, 23

Conventional wisdom is that quantum effects will tend to disappear as the number of quanta in a system increases, and the evolution of a system will become closer to that described by mean-field classical equations.

2017

Rubinsztein-Dunlop Halina et al, 2017
Journal of Optics, 19, 1, pp. 13001

Structured light refers to the generation and application of custom light fields. As the tools and technology to create and detect structured light have evolved, steadily the applications have begun to emerge.

2016

The development of novel trapping potentials for degenerate quantum gases has been an important factor driving experimental progress in the field. The introduction of spatial light modulators (SLMs) into quantum gas laboratories means that a range of configurable geometries are now possible.

Interferometric measurements with matter waves are established techniques for sensitive gravimetry, rotation sensing, and measurement of surface interactions, but compact interferometers will require techniques based on trapped geometries.

2014

McKay Parry Nicholas et al, 2014
Review of Scientific Instruments, 85, 8, pp. 86103

We describe a magnetic coil design utilizing concentrically wound electro-magnetic insulating (EMI) foil (25.4 μm Kapton backing and 127 μm thick layers). The magnetic coils are easily configurable for differentcoil sizes, while providing large surfaces for low-pressure (0.12 bar) water cooling.

ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQUS) (2011–2022)

Abstract: The future of technology lies in controlling the quantum world. The ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS) will deliver the building blocks of future quantum technologies and, critically, ensure Australian primacy in this endeavour. Three strategic research programs will target Quantum Measurement and Control; Synthetic Quantum Systems and Simulation; and Quantum-Enabled Sensors and Metrology.

ARC Discovery Projects: Riding a quantum wave: transport and flow of atomic quantum fluids (2015–2018)

Abstract: In our lab, we use lasers and magnetic fields to cool tiny samples of millions of atoms to temperatures a few billionths of a degree above absolute zero. At such cold temperatures they form a superfluid known as a Bose-Einstein condensate, that flows with zero viscosity. Using tailored light fields to trap and guide the atoms, we will build rudimentary atomic circuits, and coax the superfluid to flow through a channel between two reservoirs, firstly with thermodynamic gradients, and secondly by building a quantum pump.

Making, Probing, and Understanding Two-Dimensional Quantum Turbulence

Marsden Fund (Wellington) grant#UOO1726 (2018-2021), CI Dr Ashton Bradley, PIs Dr Tyler W Neely and Prof. Brian P Anderson (University of Arizona). 

Optimised trapping technology for atomtronic circuits and biological systems (2017)

With our succesful implementation of DMD-based optical trapping, we received a seed funding grant to collaborate with Dr. Jinyang Liang of INRS (Quebec). This goal of this grant was to develop techniques for the optimisation of greyscale DMD potentials.